Corus Radiothon funds to go toward upgrades to Stollery Beach

The Beach is a medical-free zone for kids staying at the Stollery Children's Hospital. As Morgan Black explains, the area is due for an upgrade and funds from this year's Corus Radiothon is going towards just that.

To donate to the Corus Radiothon, call 780.407.KIDS (5437), text STOLLERY to 45678 or visit the foundation’s website.

A beloved space at the Stollery Children’s Hospital is due for an upgrade and funds from this year’s Corus Radiothon are going toward doing just that.

“The Beach” is a medical-free zone for kids staying at the hospital. The space exists as a play area where kids who are in the hospital can go and spend some of their down time.

On Tuesday morning, the 22nd annual radiothon in support of Edmonton’s Stollery Children’s Hospital got underway — the radiothon is raising money for three projects:

  • Renovations to the area known as the Beach
  • Expanding mental health care at the Stollery emergency department
  • Relocating the pediatric surgery clinics from the Clinical Sciences Building to the KAYE Edmonton Clinic.

Emma, 18, and Cameron Nagel, 11, have had nearly 80 surgeries at the Stollery between them over the years.

Read more:
$1.7M raised in record-breaking Corus Radiothon for Stollery Children’s Hospital

The siblings said the time spent at the Beach was a welcome break.

“I like the Beach,” Cameron said. “Getting to meet new people, playing there, and bingo.”

The Stollery Children Hospital's "Beach" in an undated photo

The Stollery Children Hospital's "Beach" in an undated photo

Courtesy: Stollery Children's Hospital

Donations from the Corus Radiothon will go in part to funding a $6 million Beach renovation. The new spot will double in size to 4,200 square feet and will also add an outdoor space.

“We want to get a swing that’s adaptable to wheelchairs, a water play area, and a gazebo. If a child is sensitive to the outside sunlight, they can still be out there,” the Stollery’s Jenny Plume said.

Plume is the team lead for child life at the Stollery. Child life specialists focus on making kids feel comfortable and safe during their stay.

“A child life specialist focuses on play and development. They are experts in the field of play,” Plume said.

“The kids are kids first before they are patients or anything else.”

Emma said working with the child life specialists has inspired her future career aspirations.

“They really help you through your experiences to the point where I want to become one and help other kids like me,” she said.

Children at the Stollery could be at the hospital for months or even years. The upgrade will let kids experience things they may never have been able to — like watching autumn leaves change or touching fallen snow.

A child at the Stollery Children Hospital's "Beach" in an undated photo

A child at the Stollery Children Hospital's "Beach" in an undated photo

Courtesy: Stollery Children's Hospital

“Kids learn through play and are comfortable with play. It helps them learn to cope and express themselves creatively,” Plume said. “We want to make this the best environment for them.”

“It’s a time for them to really forget they are at the hospital,” Plume said.

CISN Country 103.9 will be sharing Stollery stories from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday.

Listeners can also tune in to 630 CHED Mornings with Chelsea Bird and Shaye Ganam and 630 CHED Afternoons with J’lyn Nye.

Read more:
‘They were just amazing’: Red Deer family thanks Stollery Children’s Hospital for saving daughter

Over the last 21 years, the event has raised more than $25 million.

To donate to the Corus Radiothon, call 780.407.KIDS (5437), text STOLLERY to 45678 or visit the foundation’s website.

– With files from Kirby Bourne, 630 CHED.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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